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Asymmetric Resilient Cybersecurity

ARC Principal Investigators

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Pradeep Ramuhalli, Ph.D.

Pradeep Ramuhalli, Ph.D.
(509) 375-2763

Pradeep Ramuhalli has been working on research and development in the general area of resilience and reliability for over 15 years. His research has spanned multiple technical areas, and includes sensors, integrated system health monitoring, prognostics, ultrasonic and electromagnetic inverse problems, multisensor data fusion, numerical methods, and image/signal processing. His current research is on developing and evaluating sensors and algorithms for continuous online monitoring of stressors and systems for degradation detection and characterization, prognostics algorithms to assess remaining life, and methodologies to assure resilience of degraded systems. Applications of his research are in life extension of legacy nuclear power plants, safe and economic operation of next generation nuclear power plants, cybersecurity, international safeguards, and national security.

Dr. Ramuhalli is a senior research scientist at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Prior to joining PNNL, he was an assistant professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Michigan State University, East Lansing. He received the Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering from Iowa State University, Ames, in 2002. He has authored/co-authored 3 book chapters, over 150 technical publications in peer-reviewed journals and conferences, and over 40 technical research reports. He is active in the professional community, and was elected a member of the governing Administrative Committee of the IEEE Reliability Society for a three year term (2014-2016).

Dr. Ramuhalli is a senior member of IEEE, and a member of ANS.

Project: Demonstration of Asymmetric Resilient Technologies for Cybersecurity


David Manz, Ph.D.

David Manz, Ph.D.
(509) 372-5995

David Manz has been a cybersecurity research scientist at PNNL since January 2010. He holds a B.S. in computer information science from the Robert D. Clark Honors College at the University of Oregon (2003), and an M.S. (2005) and Ph.D. (2010) in computer science from the University of Idaho.

David's work at PNNL focuses on research projects for critical infrastructure, control systems, and information assurance. These projects include group key management protocols, secure control system communication, and emergency management. David has also contributed to the development and analysis of the Secure SCADA Communications Protocol and has assisted in human factors situational cybersecurity awareness research. Prior to his work at PNNL, David spent over five years as a researcher on Group Key Management Protocols for the Center for Secure and Dependable Systems at the University of Idaho (U of I). In this position, he researched Group Key Management Protocols on wireless and partially connected networks. He also received the NSF Cyber Corps Scholarship for Service Fellowship. In 2006, David held an internship with the Laboratory for Telecommunications Sciences at the University of Maryland where he worked in the field of delay tolerant networks, explored topology generation and modeling, and evaluated open source tools to enable network protocol research, development, and testing. From 2001 to 2003, David was the senior system administrator for the Robert D. Clark Honors College at the University of Oregon where he was responsible for the entire network and student lab. David also has considerable experience teaching undergraduate and graduate computer science courses at U of I, and as an adjunct faculty at WSU. David has co-authored numerous papers and presentations on cybersecurity, control systems, and cryptographic key management.

Project: Impediments


Emilie Purvine

Emilie Purvine
(206) 528-3461

Emilie Purvine completed her B.S. in Mathematics from University of Wisconsin, Madison in 2006 and Ph.D. in Mathematics from Rutgers University, New Jersey, in 2011. Emilie then joined PNNL as a Postdoc doing work on semantic knowledge systems and graph theory. She became a permanent staff scientist in November of 2012 and continues to work on graph theory and discrete math applied to cyber security and the power grid. Recently, Emilie has also begun work on applying methods from algebraic topology to information integration and evolution of cyber systems.

Project: Topological Analysis of Graphs






Rick Riensche

Rick Riensche
(509) 375-4535

Rick Riensche

Project: Dorci












Mahantesh Halappanavar

Mahantesh Halappanavar
(509) 372-6728

Mahantesh Halappananvar is a staff scientist in the Physical and Computational Sciences Directorate at PNNL. He received masters and doctorate degrees in computer science from Old Dominion University. His research interests include the interplay of algorithm design, architectural features, and input characteristics targeting massively multithreaded architectures and emerging multicore and many-core platforms. He has worked on several application problems in the areas of electric power grids, cybersecurity, scientific computing, and social network analysis. Dr. Halappanavar has contributed to ARC since its inception through projects on modeling, metrics and resilience resulting in two best paper awards.

Project: Rendezvous: Optimization and Stochastic Algorithms for Asymmetric Resilient Infrastructure












Jeff Jensen

Jeff Jensen
(509) 375-3703

Jeff Jensen

Project: Module integration interface for Resilient Cyber System (MiiRCS)












Mark Tardiff

Mark Tardiff
(509) 375-2530

Mark Tardiff

Project: Science Council












Chance Younkin

Chance Younkin
(509) 375-5957

Chance Younkin is a Cybersecurity Engineer, working at PNNL since July 1991. Chance completed a B.S. in Computer Science from Montana Tech in Butte, MT, and then received an M.S. in Computer Science at Montana State University in Bozeman, MT.

Chance's career has been largely devoted to software development to support various PNNL programs and projects, ranging from Air Force mission planning, to atmospheric research, to molecular research, and more recently, cybersecurity.

Chance's cybersecurity work uses his software engineering background and organizational skills to develop systems and methods to support collaboration between cyber researchers and cyber defense operations teams.

Project: CyberFit



Thomas Edgar

Thomas Edgar
(509) 372-6195

Thomas Edgar

Project: CyberNet Testbed












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Asymmetric Resilient Cybersecurity

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